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File:Watermelon.jpg

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ᏄᏍᏛ ᏗᎧᏃᏗ
English: There was a time, a half century ago, when a good watermelon was rarely found in a grocery. Melon lovers had to grow their own, which, sadly, wouldn't keep for long. Then, in the 1940s, along came a USDA plant breeder who set out to bring us a better watermelon. The result was "that gray melon from Charleston," formally called the Charleston Gray. Its oblong shape and hard rind made it easy to stack and ship. Its adaptability meant it could be grown over a wide geographical area. It produced high yields and was resistant to the most serious watermelon diseases, anthracnose and fusarium wilt. Best of all, it tasted terrific! Today, there is hardly a watermelon variety grown that doesn't have a little Charleston Gray in its lineage.
ᎢᎦ
ᏅᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅᎯ http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/graphics/photos/k7241-7.htm, image number K7241-7
ᏧᏬᏪᎳᏅᎯ USDA photo by Scott Bauer

Licensing[edit]

Public domain This image is in the public domain because it contains materials that originally came from the Agricultural Research Service, the research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture.

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Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current21:00, 16 ᎠᎾᎠᎬᏘ 2007Thumbnail for version as of 21:00, 16 ᎠᎾᎠᎬᏘ 20072,700 × 1,773 (572 KB)17Drew~commonswikibrightened
07:13, 20 ᎠᏄᏱ 2006Thumbnail for version as of 07:13, 20 ᎠᏄᏱ 20062,700 × 1,773 (916 KB)Dbenbennfull size version, from ftp://199.133.10.188/k7241-7.jpg
18:22, 8 ᏚᏂᏅᏗ 2005Thumbnail for version as of 18:22, 8 ᏚᏂᏅᏗ 2005640 × 461 (60 KB)Dodo;Caption: There was a time, a half century ago, when a good watermelon was rarely found in a grocery. Melon lovers had to grow their own, which, sadly, wouldn't keep for long. Then, in the 1940s, along came a USDA plant breeder who set out to brin

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